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Archive for the ‘Public relations’ Category

Social media and public relations: BF4E?

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A number of bloggers recently have addressed the connection between an organization’s social media efforts and public relations pros. PR departments are being given control of the purse strings more often than marketing, allowing communications professionals to essentially dominate the social media landscape.

While some believe that no one department can really own social media, it’s clear that PR professionals seem to leading the charge when it comes to these campaigns across the board.

So why the heck is this happening? Why are a bunch of grammar-loving flacks also heading up the dive into the Twitterverse and such?

Same goals, different mediums

The bottom line is that both public relations and social media have the same end goal: relationship management. In fact, I’d argue that you can’t really separate social media from public relations; social media is simply a tool that helps augment results in PR. To take a line from Christina Warren’s Mashable post,

PR professionals are using social media in a lot of ways to either supplement or add on to existing PR strategies. The most successful PR pros focus on creating active relationships and truly engaging with their customers (or constituents) to have a real conversation.

Social media, just like PR, is about building relationships, not generating sales (at least not directly). Both are about boosting your reputation and helping your organization to stay top-of-mind.

Do you think PR should head up social media efforts?

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Written by melissa

June 7, 2010 at 8:00 am

Why bother measuring?

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My last post generated a lot of interest, and a lot of agreement that some kind of measurement needs to be in play when talking about the less quantifiable fields of social media and public relations. Nick Brown from InsuranceHQ made a great point noting that,

ROI will always be relevant as long as the social media/PR practitioners are NOT the bosses.

Yup. ROI to justify our very existence. It’s a cold, hard fact, but it is up to the PR and social media professionals to translate their value to management. A practitioner’s intuitive “sixth sense” is not enough.

It provides justification for the very existence of such a department. Communication is often the first area to get cut from the budget, simply because there are no immediately observable effects on sales or profit.

One noted communication scholar, Dr. Geduldig, paints the picture,

A hard-nosed manager would have a tough job evaluating a function that cannot be defined and can do well when it does nothing … Don’t expect others to buy public relations on faith. If public relations doesn’t set standards of measurement that are both objective and meaningful, management will apply its own, and the value of public relations will ultimately be measured against the bottom line.

Proving your worth is no longer as simple as showing evidence of volume or claiming public relations, social media and reputation evaluation to be intangible and not subject to measure—managers are demanding quantifiable results of practitioners

Ah, but measurement does actually have a greater, nobler purpose than securing our paychecks (though that in itself isn’t too bad). It helps determine whether or not we are meeting the objectives we’ve set for our communicative efforts. Is social media helping our agency? Is our public relations campaign effective? How can we do better? You can’t attack these questions without having some sort of measurement and evaluation program in place.

So what do you think—why should we be measuring our public relations and social media efforts?

Written by melissa

June 1, 2010 at 9:00 am

ROI: Ridiculous, obsolete idea?

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Shame on me. It’s been a week. I blame a lot of things, not the least of which was the shock associated with the LOST series finale.

This interview of Ryan Hanley (a fellow resident of beautiful Albany), conducted by Peter van Aartrijk and Rick Morgan, got me thinking about one of the topics du jour in social media, the search for return on investment.

According to Ryan,

Everyone says, well, what’s your ROI? At this point in the social media movement, to try to slap ROI on it and make a business decision is going to be tough to do. Because it’s hard to calculate.

Don’t I know it! How can I provide quantified, tangible results explaining how valuable my organization’s Twitter accounts are? How can I create a correlation between our LinkedIn groups and sales? How do I explain that no, I’m not just fooling around on the ‘net, I’m actually building relationships? It’s not easy. Heck, it’s pretty close to impossible.

Well, all this talk about ROI made me nostalgic. For the past six months, I’ve been immersed in my (finally completed) master’s thesis, AKA the bane of my existence, which focused on measurement in an area equally as intangible as social media, public relations. Think about it: How do you measure reputation? How do you measure client perception?  Same issue.

A bit of self-plagiarism, and the complication of measurement is clear,

With sales, one can measure end-of-year figures against a set of objectives at the beginning of the year. But public relations is much more nebulous; how can you measure the goal of increased visibility and awareness? How can you track all the instances that a consumer recalled your brand as a result of some positive press he or she read in the local newspaper? Such black-and-white, A-to-B type measurement is not just impractical, but also, nearly impossible to conduct in this field.

While my very own words seem to echo the advice of those who say we need to look past ROI, I don’t completely agree. Measurement is still important.  It helps to determine if our efforts were effective and to decide which strategies to keep, which to trash. It makes us more reflective, and, ultimately, better practitioners. As one scholar put it, “You can only manage what you measure.” But, I do think that today’s measurement techniques need to be different than what we’ve relied on in the past.

So what do you think? Is the concept of ROI in public relations and social media as outdated as the betamax?

Coming soon … well, smarty pants, how DO we measure reputation? Stay tuned …

Written by melissa

May 27, 2010 at 3:31 pm

PR grads: Congrats. Now get real.

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Welcome to graduation season. A time for family gatherings, cards holding checks with multiple zeroes and the obligatory advice to the graduating young adult blog posts.

Like so many other bright-eyed young students, I graduated this past Saturday, with my M.A. in organizational communication. I was a rarity in my department—a working professional with several years of experience in the field, as opposed to students who had moved directly from undergrad to grad work. As I listened to commencement speakers talking about the value of a communications degree, I kept wondering to myself, are these kids really prepared for the working world? No one ever told me that you’re supposed to learn how to actually DO something in college, develop a skill set that could help me support myself.

Public relations jobs are out there, but not always easy to come by in this market. And there are plenty of great tips and advice out there for graduates to learn how to land a job and succeed early in their careers. In the spirit of the season, I’m also contributing my insight, not about how to get a job in PR, but how to survive in it, with some tidbits that your professors probably never told you.

  • Get used to explaining what you do to friends and family, over and over again.
  • Accept that you don’t know jack about PR. No matter how many internships or “real world” classes you’ve taken, what the field actually entails won’t sink in till you’ve spent a few years in the trenches. There’s always more to learn.
  • Understand that “flashy” industry jobs (sports, fashion, entertainment, etc.) are the hardest to come by. If you want to emulate Samantha from Sex and the City, you can, but be prepared for it to (1) take years or (2) not work out exactly as you planned.
  • Agency experience is worth its weight in gold. Get some under your belt. It shows you can deal with crazy deadlines, demanding workloads and multiple clients. Plus, there’s no better way to learn a whole lot, quickly.
  • Keep in touch with everyone. Even that awkward kid on your floor from freshman year of college. Actually, ESPECIALLY that kid. Technology makes it easy, so there’s no excuse.
  • Want to make real money? Move to New York City. Now.
  • Your attitude is more important than your appearance. You could be in ripped jeans and a t-shirt, but make make damn sure you’re wearing a smile, every single day. PR is about being a company cheerleader, so act like one.
  • Maintain your hobbies and interests. It makes it a heck of lot easier when breaking the ice with clients and the media. Being an actual, living, breathing human being makes you likable, rather than a desperate flack.
  • Keep writing. And I don’t mean just for work, but personal pursuits as well. Get a Moleskin and keep it with you at all times. If you think this is ridiculous, start googling a new degree program, cause this isn’t the field for you.

So congratulations grads, welcome to the real world! Now get to work. And here’s a shout to some of the most eligible up-and-coming young professionals in the industry, featured on #HAPPO—you should think about hiring them.

Written by melissa

May 16, 2010 at 8:31 pm

How many hats are you wearing?

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Inspired by this post at the PRBreakfast Club, I’ve been thinking more and more about the various job functions I perform under the deceptively limited title of “public relations specialist.” Here are some of the roles I serve, in addition to my chief role of handling media relations:

  • Reporter
  • Videographer
  • Poster maker
  • Sound editor
  • Photographer
  • Proofreader
  • Web designer
  • Social media guru
  • Schmoozer
  • Conference assistant
  • Media trainer
  • Ghostwriter
  • Negotiator
  • Researcher
  • PowerPoint expert
  • Framer
  • Driver
  • Speech writer

That “other duties as assigned” bullet on my job description is getting quite the workout!

It’s not just me. Companies across the board are trying to do more with less. Of course, I got to thinking about insurance, and specifically about agents. Insurance agents are advisors, friends, legal experts, financial experts, claims handlers, marketers, CEOs, accountants and so much more. There’s no limit to the functions you must serve, particularly if you run your own small, independent agency.

So what profession are you in that requires many hats?

Written by melissa

May 4, 2010 at 10:08 am

Posted in Careers, Public relations

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It’s all a matter of trust

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There’s a reason why the Bad Pitch blog exists: lazy public relations professionals.

Media relations, in particular, gets a terrible rap, especially when you talk to journalists. There have been a host of articles on this subject, from public relations and journalism professionals alike, but it all can be boiled down to one thing: trust.

Without spending the time to develop solid, trusting relationships with the media, you risk being on the outside looking in. Think about it- how often do you delete strange e-mails, marked “spam,” from senders you don’t know? It’s the same story on the other side of the newsroom, exacerbated even more by the crunch in the industry.

Here are some ideas for building relationships with your target media:

  • Get to know your media. I cannot stress this enough: DO NOT pick up the phone until you’ve done some research. Find out everything you can about your target media.  Doing your homework is vital; know exactly who to call for specific topics. If you have no luck, call up an editorial assistant and inquire about who covers what.
  • Make contact. Don’t let your first contact with a reporter be when you need something; offer your help first. This can be as simple as sending a note to a reporter, suggesting he or she contact you when working on a story in your area of expertise. Offer relevant topic ideas. Make a journalist’s job easier- they are busy folks.
  • Keep in touch. Send a reporter links to news stories that may be of interest. When working with local media, offer suggestions for how to make national issues have a local spin. Comment on a journalist’s blog, send an e-mail about a recent story, stay interested in his or her work.

There’s a good reason the word “relations” is right there in the title of this field- it’s all about developing relationships. Whether that’s with the community at large or targeted media, it all comes down to being a trusted resource for your audience.

Written by melissa

April 27, 2010 at 12:29 pm